Department of History

Current Courses

2019-20

NB:

  1. Cross-listed courses:  certain courses offered by the Departments of Modern Languages and Classics, Anthropology, and Religious Studies may, in special circumstances, be cross-listed and counted towards a major, minor, or concentration in History. In such cases, the student must obtain the Department's permission.  Those courses automatically acceptable in History are listed in the Academic Calendar and appear below.

  2. The following denotes full-year courses: "1XX/2YY," "AXX/AYY," "BXX/BYY." Students must enroll for both semesters when registering.  (The A and B designations denote different sections of the same course.)

  3. "WW" denotes web courses.

  4. Students are reminded that not every course listed in the Academic Calendar can be offered every year.  Some classes are only offered every couple years.  Students are encouraged to consult with the Department regarding course offerings in planning their schedules.

  5. Students are reminded that courses in History can be applicable for credit towards majors and minors in other disciplines and interdisciplinary programs and that not all courses automatically appear as such in the Academic Calendar.  Students are encouraged to consult with Departmental Chairs and Program Coordinators about specific courses in History that may be eligible for credit in programs outside History.

Class locations:

AG Art Gallery of Nova Scotia
AT Atrium
B Burke Building
DA Akerley Blvd., Dartmouth
DL Dartmouth Library
DT Spring Garden Road Library
HC Homburg Centre
LA Loyola Academic
ME McNally East
MM McNally Main
MN McNally North
MS McNally South
P21 Pier 21
SB Sobey Building
WT World Trade Convention Center

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1000 1A - Making History (Fall)
M. Vance
TR 8:30-9:45 am
Class location: LA274
Course Description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1000 1B - Making History (Fall)
R. Barbosa
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA282
Course description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1000 2A - Making History (Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA273
Course description: Course description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1000 2B - Making History (Winter)
R. Barbosa
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA282
Course description: Course description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events.
 
HIST 1203.1XX/2YY - Twentieth Century in Europe (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
M. Hefler
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course surveys the major issues and events of the Twentieth Century in Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the First and Second World Wars, the Nazi regime and the Holocaust, the emergence of the United States as a world power, Communist revolutions and their impact, and the effects of all of these events on the lives of ordinary people.
 
HIST 1222 1 - Intro to East Asian History (Fall)
B. Sewell
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA277
Course description: This introductory course explores historical change and social transformation in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from antiquity to the present. Emphasizing especially the Chinese and Japanese experiences, this class will examine some of the most salient social, intellectual, political, and economic features apparent in the heritage of these societies, as well as some of the ways each society has influenced the others.
 
HIST 1222 2 - Intro to East Asian History (Winter)
B. Sewell
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: B221
Course description: This introductory course explores historical change and social transformation in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from antiquity to the present. Emphasizing especially the Chinese and Japanese experiences, this class will examine some of the most salient social, intellectual, political, and economic features apparent in the heritage of these societies, as well as some of the ways each society has influenced the others.
 
HIST 1252 1A– Canada to Confederation (Fall)
N. Neatby
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: B205
Course description: This course will examine early Canadian history from the time of the first native-European contact up to Confederation.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of New France/Lower Canada, Upper Canada, and the West.  Political, social, and economic themes will be considered.
 
HIST 1252 1B - Canada Confederation (Fall)
D. Banoub
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course will examine early Canadian history from the time of the first native-European contact up to Confederation.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of New France/Lower Canada, Upper Canada, and the West.  Political, social, and economic themes will be considered.
 
HIST 1253 1A - Canada: Confederation to Present (Fall)
H. Green
MW 11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Class location: LA181
Course description: This course will examine the shape of political culture in modern Canada; the debate between the advocates of the nation state and of federalism; and the impact of industrialization, regionalism, war, and depression on that debate.
 
HIST 1253 2A – Canada: Conferation to Present (Winter)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location:SB260
Course description: This course will examine the shape of political culture in modern Canada; the debate between the advocates of the nation state and of federalism; and the impact of industrialization, regionalism, war, and depression on that debate.
 
HIST 1253 2B - Canada: Confederation to Present (Winter)
H. Green
TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: SB160
Course description: See above
 
HIST 1255 1A - The United States: 1865 to Present (Fall)
TBA
TR 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA297
Course Description: This course will explore the history of the modern United States since its Civil War, examining the social, economic, political, and transnational developments of the last century and a half. Through lectures and reading, we will cover such themes as political economy, international relations, urbanization, social movements, migration, and the development of the state.
 
HIST 1255 2 - The United States: 1865 to Present  (Winter)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course will explore the history of the modern United States since its Civil War, examining the social, economic, political, and transnational developments of the last century and a half. Through lectures and reading, we will cover such themes as political economy, international relations, urbanization, social movements, migration, and the development of the state.
 
HIST 1301 1A - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Fall)
L. Digdon
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm 
Class location: LA297
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 1B - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Fall)
L. Digdon
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: ME105
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 2A - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Winter)
L. Digdon
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am 
Class location: LA296
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 2B - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Winter)
L. Digdon

MW 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA188

Course description: The modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 

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2000 Level Courses 

HIST 2201 2 - Environmental History of Europe: 1300-1900 (Winter)
L. Warner
Web Course
Course description: From farming practices in the medieval period to the smog and blackened landscapes of the industrial nineteenth century, Europeans have had an impact on their environment. Students explore the changes and how European encounters with the new world brought disease, and an exchange of foods, animals and plants between 204 History the continents. This course provides a long-term perspective on changes in climate, water and land use, breeding as well as species extinction, and the foods available in Europe and its North American colonies from 1300-1900.
 
HIST 2250 1 Soccer: A History of Brazil (Fall)
R. Barbosa
T 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: LA271
Course description: Students will trace the historical forces behind the evolution of soccer in Brazil – from an elite sport to a national passion with unifying powers. Topics include: the transition to a slave free society, immigration, the development of a national identity, urbanization, the military dictatorship, as well as gender divisions and the role of the media and economics behind the popularity of the sport.
 
HIST 2251 2 - Pop Culture in Latin America (Winter)
R. Barbosa
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: AT216
Course description: Students explore the development of popular culture in Latin America to discover how diversity, social and political struggles influenced the diverse cultural aspects of the region. Music will be a major focus (samba, salsa, tango among others), but emphasis will be also given to visual arts, film and TV.
 
HIST 2311 2 - Inheriting Atlantic Canada (Winter)
R. Field
MW 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA178
Course description: Ideas, attitudes, and assumptions about Atlantic Canada have been influenced by social, cultural, political, religious, and ethnic traditions inherited from the past. The curriculum of this course covers a wide range of topics from gender, refinement, material culture, dress, food, and conspicuous consumption, to political choices and ethnic biases. Lectures, readings, class discussions, and mixed media demonstrate how historical events and previous ways of behaving and thinking continue to influence social and cultural customs and decision-making. 
 
HIST 2336 2 - Britain 1688-1870 (Winter)
M. Vance
TR 8:30 - 9:45 am
Course location: LA274
Course description: The period examined in this course is not only associated with the creation of the British state, but also its rise, by the middle of the 19th century, to the leading world power. Yet recent literature has demonstrated that this development was accompanied by profound social and economic transformations that were highly contested. In order to appreciate the nature of these struggles, this course will cover such diverse topics as the impact of overseas expansion, warfare, agricultural and industrial change, migration, political radicalism, and 19th-century Victorian morality.
 
HIST 2341 2 - Alantic Provinces History to 1867 (Winter)
S. Joudrey
MW  2:30 - 3:45 pm
Course location: B207
Course description: Commencing with the earliest Native-European contact in the Atlantic Provinces, students in this course will examine the interactions among the peoples who inhabited the region up until the mid-nineteenth century. Major events, such as wars, treaties, and Confederation will also be considered.
 
HIST 2354 2 - Japan before 1800 (Winter)
B. Sewell
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA273
Course description: After a brief survey of prehistoric Japan, this course explores two formative eras in Japanese history:  the era of courtly (or aristocratic) society and the era of the samurai (warriors).  Although the course proceeds chronologically, in order to provide students with a more analytical understanding the course employs a thematic approach, considering political, economic, intellectual, and social issues in each era.  No previous study of Japan is required.
 
HIST 2401 2 - Canadian Political History (Winter)
D. Banoub
W 7:00 - 9:30 pm
Class location: LA273
Course description: The course is an overview of Canadian political history from Confederation to the early 2000s, introducing students to the study of political power in its historical, social, and cultural context. Focusing mainly on federal politics, the course will examine expressions of authority and resistance in Canadian history, stressing the complicated interactions between governed and governors. The study of politicians and key events in Canada’s political history will be grounded in themes of inclusion and exclusion, and coercion and consent. Students are encouraged to think culturally, investigating how politics draw from and contribute to ideas about race, class, and gender. While the history of Canadian politics will be the course’s focus, lectures, assignments, and discussions will also stress the politics of history-making in Canada, focusing on how certain narratives have been politicized.
 
HIST 2402 1 - History of Cuba (Fall)
I. Saney
MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: Students will gain a multifaceted and nuanced view of Cuba's complex past, examining how this history has shaped and continues to shape the present. Themes include gender and race relations, social policies and programs, governance and politics, state-building and economic development.
 
HIST 2403 1 - History of Canadian Culture(s) (Fall)
N. Neatby
TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA176
Course description: This course is an examination of Canadian culture/s from the late 19th century to the present. Throughout the course we will discuss how those who live in Canada have defined what is
Canadian about Canadian culture. Particular attention will be paid to how that culture has been produced and circulated in various forms including novels, magazines, music, art, film, radio, television and other public manifestations such as celebration of holidays, fairs and commemorative events.
 
HIST 2420 1 - The World at War 1914-1918 (Fall)
D. Campbell
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: Students are introduced to the Second World War and its importance in global history. Themes include: the war’s roots in the 1910s, the goals of Axis and Allied powers, and military operations on land, at sea, and in the air. Special attention will be paid to the war’s impact on civilians.
 
HIST 2440 1 - Revolutions in Latin America (Fall)
R. Barbosa
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM209
Course description: Students examine some of the major revolutions that have taken place in 20th-Century Latin America. Students explore the background, participants, reasons and consequences of these revolutions.
 
HIST 2451 1 - Greek History I: Minos to Medes (Fall)
A. Barclay
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the ancient Greeks from the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars. Students will explore Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations of the Late Bronze Age and the social, historical and cultural developments of early Iron Age and Archaic Greece, including the evolution of the polis and early political systems (tyranny, the Spartan military state, the early phases of Athenian democracy); cultural interactions among the ancient Mediterranean civilizations; pre-Classical Greek religion, art, architecture; and literature. 
 
HIST 2453 1 - Republic & Revolution: Rome History (Fall)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: AT216
Course description: An introduction to the history of Italy and the city of Rome from the Iron Age through the end of the Roman republican system of government. This course will explore the origins and evolution of the Roman Republic, including the interaction among Romans, their Italian neighbours such as the Etruscans, and the Greek and Phoenician peoples of the eastern Mediterranean. 
 
HIST 2471 1 - History of Football (Fall)
J. Reid
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: Students analytically examine the evolution of sports such as soccer, rugby, Australian and North American football from the nineteenth century onwards, commencing with the earliest forms of vernacular football. Australian and North American football from the nineteenth century onwards. Although the scope will be international, special attention will be paid to Atlantic Canada.
 
HIST 2826 1XW/2YW - War and Society (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
D. Campbell
WEB
Course description: This course is an introduction to warfare as it was practiced by the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean and the degree to which military organization and the act of waging war affected other aspects of these societies, including political ideology, religious beliefs, and economic exchange systems
 
HIST 2833 1 - Special Topic: Environmental History of North America (Fall)
H. Green
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: HC211
Course description: This special topics course will introduce students to the skills and practice of doing environmental history – a historical approach that examines the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world and emphasizes the importance of the physical environment to our past. The goal of this course is to understand the historical interactions and relationships between human groups and the rest of the natural environment.
 
HIST 2839 2 - Piracy & Privateering Atlantic Canada (Winter)
TBA
R 6:00 - 8:45 pm
Class location: ME104
Course description: This course will explore the history and culture of piracy and privateering in Atlantic Canada, from 1600 until the present day. Pirates, outlaws who steal and murder at sea, and privateers, state-sanctioned sea raiders, have a long history in Atlantic Canada, beginning with the dawn of European colonization. Pirates and privateers have also spawned a rich cultural legacy in literature and popular culture. This course will look at the history of pirates and privateers in Atlantic Canada and the unique cultures that evolved aboard their ships. We will also explore how this history has been depicted and romanticized in popular culture, from Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island to the History Channel’s Curse of Oak Island and how public historians have explored piracy through material culture in museums. 

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3000 Level Courses 

HIST 3000 1 - The Discipline of History (Fall)
B. Brown
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm 
Class location: MM223
Course description: This course addresses the theories, methods, principles and problems associated with the discipline of history. It examines the following basic areas of historical inquiry: the purposes of historical study; the relevance of the past; the relationship between the past and present; the nature and validity of historical knowledge; the relationship of history to other disciplines; and the development of historical interpretation. 
 
HIST 3000 2 - The Discipline of History (Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: ME104
Course description: This course addresses the theories, methods, principles and problems associated with the discipline of history. It examines the following basic areas of historical inquiry: the purposes of historical study; the relevance of the past; the relationship between the past and present; the nature and validity of historical knowledge; the relationship of history to other disciplines; and the development of historical interpretation. 
 
HIST 3110 1 - Women in the Two World Wars (Fall)
K. Freeman

TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA178 

Course description: Students examine women’s experiences during the First and Second World Wars. During both conflicts, women fought as soldiers and spies, worked in industry and support services, tended to the wounded and served as symbols of home and family. Women were also targets of unprecedented violence. 
 
HIST 3202 2 - History of Medicine (Winter)
TBA
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: B207
Course description: Students examine the history of medicine, with an emphasis on Europe and North America, and how medicine in those areas interacted with other medical systems, including Arabic and Chinese medicine. Topics to be considered will include the impact of epidemic disease, ideas of disease causation and treatment, the rise of the hospital, medicine and war, and the creation of an idea of international and global health.
 
HIST 3300 1WW - British Pop Music & Culture (Fall)
A. Knapp
WEB
Course description: This course will explore popular culture in the United Kingdom during the 19th and 20th centuries through the study of popular music. Attention will be given to the youth culture that emerged after the Second World War and its importance for the spread of Rock and Pop music. In addition to developments in the United Kingdom, American and Imperial cultural influences will also be examined through musical styles and movements such as Rock and Roll, Punk, and Reggae.
 
HIST 3352 2 - Race & Racism in the US (Winter)
I. Saney
MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm 
Class location: ME108
Course description: The racial roots of US history are traced in order to explore the importance of struggles for racial justice as well as changes and continuities in forms of racial oppression.
 
HIST 3400 2 - Rome's Eternal Glory (Winter)
M. McCallum
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA178
Course description: Students examine a key transitional historical period in the Roman world, with the dissolution of the republic and its replacement with a monarchy during the reign of Rome’s first emperor. Through a close analysis of ancient material and textual evidence, students will examine and evaluate the Age of Augustus.
 
HIST 3403 1 - Invention of Canada (Fall)
B. Brown
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA276
Course description: Nations can be defined in many ways. Most obviously, they are political jurisdictions characterized by clear geographic boundaries, with constitutionally established legislative, juridical and coercive institutions, and in the case of democratic nations such as Canada, regular elections, a free press, and guaranteed freedoms of speech and association. But nations are also imaginary constructs. Over the years different generations of Canadians have imagined their history, and the presumed values or social purposes that the nation embodies, in different ways. This course will look at the ways in which various generations of Canadians “invented” Canada and its history. This course will be an exercise in deconstructing shifting national mythologies and the interests that they served in order to present a more inclusive and comprehensive understanding of Canada’s past.
 
HIST 3406 2 - The Renaissance in Europe (Winter)
L. Warner
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA178
Course description: This course explores the Renaissance from its beginning in Italy and to its spread across Europe. Through the work of artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer or Jan van Eyck as well as writers such as Machiavelli, Erasmus, Louise Labé or Montaigne, students will trace the developments of European culture in the Renaissance.
 
HIST 3417 2 - War & Memory in the 20th Century (Winter)
D. Campbell
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM209
Course description: This course will explore the experience of modern war and the ways in which various twentieth-century conflicts have been remembered socially and culturally. The topics covered include the First and Second World Wars, the Holocaust, the Algerian War, the Vietnam War, and the Balkan Wars. The focus of our study of these events will be on their impact on the values, attitudes and collective memory of European and North American societies.
 
HIST 3475 2 - Indigenous & Settler Histories (Winter)
M. Vance
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM227
Class description: The relationship between indigenous peoples and settler societies has been problematic wherever European colonization has taken place. In this course, students will study how these relationships have evolved over time with a view to developing a historical understanding of contemporary issues. This term, the course explores five themes - Treaties, Resources, Imagined “Indian-ness,” Assimilation and Resistance, in order to assist students in developing a critical understanding of the relationship between indigenous and settler societies in British North America from the late eighteenth century to the present.
 
HIST 3480 1 - Afro-Brazilian History (Fall)
R. Barbosa
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA274
Course description: This course analyses Brazil’s role in the Atlantic World from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries, focusing on socioeconomic and political issues related to Afro-Brazilian History. Topics include the colonial economy, slavery, the movement for independence and its failure to bring about change, the consequences of colonialism, as well as the impact of industrialization, urbanization and immigration on the social conditions of Afro-Brazilians.
 
HIST 3490 1 - Special Topic: History of Fashion & Clothing (Fall)
S. Joudrey
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: This special topics course provides students with an introduction to the critical study of modern culture by specifically considering the significance of fashion and clothing development in Europe and North America.
 
HIST 3836 2 - Special Topic: War Crimes Trials (Winter)
M. Hefler
TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA179
Course description: This course follows the evolution of the laws of war and war crimes trials as they have been altered and applied against the changing nature of warfare from the penning of the Lieber Code in 1863 through to the adoption of the Rome Statute in 1998 which provided the legal basis for the International Criminal Court. It explores historical negotiations, legal precedents, and investigates how and when the laws of war have been tested, ignored, and enforced for prevention and punishment in global and civil wars, wars of independence, as well as ethnic conflicts throughout the twentieth century. Through lectures, readings, research, and discussion groups, students will be exposed to the legal, diplomatic, strategic, and human rights mechanisms of restricting warfare, and identify the considerable problems that have emerged from efforts to prevent war crimes or seek justice in the aftermath of their repeated commission.
 
HIST 3898 2 - Special Topic: Tourism in North America (Winter)
N. Neatby
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: North America has long been a travel destination but the reasons people travelled changed considerably starting in the late decades of the nineteenth century and most significantly during the 20th century. This course will trace the multiple factors that came into play to transform this travel experiencee including technological advances in transportation, the increasing affordability of leisure time and travel and the growing involvement of the state in the tourism business. Travelers, whether from North America or abroad, visited different regions of the continent. Students will examine the extent to which their expectations were met once they got there and how these evolved over time. through travel writing. Attention will be given to tourists' search for an authentic experiencee and how the host population reacted to visitors. In parallel, the course will follow how promoters chose to represent and sell their region by analyzing advertizing. 
 

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4000 Level Courses

HIST 4500 1XX/2YY - The Honours Seminar (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
K. Freeman
W 1:00 - 3:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Honours History students have the opportunity to engage in independent research and write an honours thesis with the help and direction of a supervisor.  The Honours Seminar provides a framework to assist each student in the preparation of the thesis.  The seminar places an emphasis on research skills, historical methods and approaches, theories of history and the use of sources and evidence in order to help students develop and write the honours thesis.  Students will be evaluated on their course work and presentations as well as the honours thesis.
 
HIST 4501 0YY - Public History (Winter)
N. Neatby 
T 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Prerequisite: Students are required to have completed 24 credit hours in History with an average of 3.3, or obtain permission from the instructor This course introduces students both to the field of public history and to the application of history and historical methods in a variety of workplace settings. Public history, which involves the practices and presentation of history outside academia, involves a wide range of practioners including historians, museum curators, film makers, researchers, journalists, and archivists. This course will examine the evolution of public history as a discipline since the 1960s and focus on the presentation of history in various films, exhibits and historic sites. The course content will be primarily Canadian and American examining questions about ethics, standards and audience. The course will have both a classroom and workplace component. Seminar three hours per week plus successful completion of eight hours weekly of mentored volunteer work in a public history work setting.
 
HIST 4508 2 - Broken Families/Stepfamilies (Winter)
L. Warner
T 1:00 - 3:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In the twentieth century, the rise in rates of divorce and the visibility of single parent families came to symbolize the breakdown of ‘traditional’ family values. Yet prior to the 1900s, death often put a swift end to many marriages. This seminar explores the families and living arrangements that fell outside of the nostalgic ideal of the ‘traditional’ family from the 1500s onward by looking at the widowed and orphaned, at remarriage, stepfamilies, custody arrangements and illegitimacy. The seminar will focus on Europe to examine a variety of sources including novels, diaries, fairy tales, conduct books, legal records, census data, funerary monuments, paintings and printed material to study the idea of stepfamilies. Some comparisons to historical family types around the world will also be considered.
 
HIST 4573 1 - Rise & Fall of Japanese Empire
B. Sewell
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Although a product of the same era in global history as other nineteenth- and twentieth-century empires, the Japanese Empire was more subject to distinctly Asian influences. This particular historical experience is explored through an examination of social, intellectual, and cultural concerns alongside the more usual issues involving economics and international relations.
 
HIST 4574 2 - Interdisciplinary Study of Asia: Food (Winter)
B. Sewell
R 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this seminar students examine memories of the Asia-Pacific War in China, Korea and Japan. They will investigate how history and politics have been shaping and shaped by collective and individual memories of this conflict.
 
HIST 4833 1 - Special Topic: Guns, Violence & Law (Fall)
B. Brown
T 1:00 - 3:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This seminar course examines the cultural and legal implications of private firearm ownership and use in Canada. After surveying advancements in firearm design and manufacturing, the course considers the role of guns in hunting culture, crime, youth organizations, the definition of masculinity, and the militia movement. Finally, the history of gun control is examined, from the efforts to prevent the sale of guns to Aboriginal Peoples to recent debates over gun control in Britain, the United States, and Canada.
 
HIST4840 1 - Remember World War in Britain (Fall)
M. Vance
R 2:30 - 4:00 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this special topics seminar field course, students will study monuments and landscapes in southern England linked to both World Wars in order to develop their understanding of the relationship between commemoration and memory. The focus will be on sites associated with Canadian participation in the conflicts and how the memory of their involvement is maintained - from displays at the Imperial War Museum in London to memorials in village church yards in Sussex. Students will meet in class weekly before travelling during the November reading week – allowing them to experience Remembrance Day in the UK.
 
HIST 4846 2 - Seminar in Community Leadersip (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this course students use historical perspectives to understand current affairs in meaningful and evidence-based ways. Students are challenged to think about the broad application of research, communication, and critical-thinking skills to real-world situations through guest lectures, innovative learning materials and project creation. 

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6000 Level Courses

HIST 6501 0YY - Public History (Winter)
N. Neatby
T 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
 
Course description: Prerequisite: Students are required to have completed 24 credit hours in History with an average of 3.3, or obtain permission from the instructor This course introduces students both to the field of public history and to the application of history and historical methods in a variety of workplace settings. Public history, which involves the practices and presentation of history outside academia, involves a wide range of practioners including historians, museum curators, film makers, researchers, journalists, and archivists. This course will examine the evolution of public history as a discipline since the 1960s and focus on the presentation of history in various films, exhibits and historic sites. The course content will be primarily Canadian and American examining questions about ethics, standards and audience. The course will have both a classroom and workplace component. Seminar three hours per week plus successful completion of eight hours weekly of mentored volunteer work in a public history work setting.
 
HIST 6573 1 - Rise & Fall of Japanese Empire (Fall)
B. Sewell
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Although a product of the same era in global history as other nineteenth- and twentieth-century empires, the Japanese Empire was more subject to distinctly Asian influences. This particular historical experience is explored through an examination of social, intellectual, and cultural concerns alongside the more usual issues involving economics and international relations.
 
HIST 6574 2 - Interdisciplinary Study Asia (Winter)
B. Sewell
R 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this seminar students examine memories of the Asia-Pacific War in China, Korea and Japan. They will investigate how history and politics have been shaping and shaped by collective and individual memories of this conflict.
 
HIST 6650 1XX/2YY - Seminar in Advanced Historiography (Fall/Winter)  - Required
6 credits (Full-year course)
K. Freeman
W 1:00 - 3:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course Description: This seminar will examine selected contemporary historiographical issues and guide Masters students in the preparation of their thesis proposals.
 
HIST 6670 1 - Remember World War in Britain (Fall)
M. Vance
R 2:30 - 4:00 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this special topics seminar field course, students will study monuments and landscapes in southern England linked to both World Wars in order to develop their understanding of the relationship between commemoration and memory. The focus will be on sites associated with Canadian participation in the conflicts and how the memory of their involvement is maintained - from displays at the Imperial War Museum in London to memorials in village church yards in Sussex. Students will meet in class weekly before travelling during the November reading week – allowing them to experience Remembrance Day in the UK.
 
HIST 6670 2 - Grad Seminar: Community Leadership (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this course students use historical perspectives to understand current affairs in meaningful and evidence-based ways. Students are challenged to think about the broad application of research, communication, and critical-thinking skills to real-world situations through guest lectures, innovative learning materials and project creation. 
 
HIST 6673 1 - Special Topic: Guns, Violence & Law (Fall)
B. Brown
T 1:00 - 3:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This seminar course examines the cultural and legal implications of private firearm ownership and use in Canada. After surveying advancements in firearm design and manufacturing, the course considers the role of guns in hunting culture, crime, youth organizations, the definition of masculinity, and the militia movement. Finally, the history of gun control is examined, from the efforts to prevent the sale of guns to Aboriginal Peoples to recent debates over gun control in Britain, the United States, and Canada.
 
HIST 6690 1XX/2YY – Thesis Research (Fall/Winter) - Required
K. Freeman
TBA
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Students will engage in the research and writing of a thesis under the supervision of a thesis supervisor.  The student must satisfy the supervisor that thesis research and all other methodological and disciplinary preparation for the successful handling of the thesis topic have been completed.  Supervisors may require a demonstration of language competence or extra course work as preparation for the treatment of certain thesis topics.  Students will publicly defend their thesis, following which a final grade will be determined by the thesis committee.
 

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