Criminology

A degree in Criminology provides students with an opportunity for focused study of various forms of regulation, policing, punishment, justice, law, corrections and justice  The development of a coherent program at the undergraduate level enables students to obtain a solid foundation in Criminology for further study at the graduate level; for the pursuit of Criminology-related disciplines; and for careers in the related professions. The Department of Criminology offers minor, major, honours, and master’s programs.

Program Changes in 2019-20

Beginning September 2019, significant changes will be made to SMU’s criminology undergraduate program, including changes to the admission criteria, major and minor requirements, and curriculum. These changes are being made to better support the needs and interests of SMU students pursuing a degree in criminology. Please see below for more information. 

Questions and Answers about 2019-20 Program Changes

 

Q:  What courses will I need to complete my criminology major?

A:  Consult the diagram above. If you have questions about your criminology major, visit a criminology advisor. Advising hours may be found at: https://smu.ca/academics/departments/crim-academic-advising.html  

 

Q:  I haven’t yet declared my major. How do I enter the criminology major program?

A:  To declare a major in criminology in 2019-20, you must have passed CRIM 1303 or CRIM 2303 (Introduction to Criminology), and obtained at least a B- in CRIM 2304 or CRIM 3304 (Canadian Criminal Justice System) and CRIM 2110 (Exploring Criminology).

 

Q:  I’m interested in doing a minor in criminology. What are the entry requirements?

A:  The requirements to enter the minor program in criminology are the same as the major program: Passing CRIM 1303 or CRIM 2303 (Introduction to Criminology), and obtained at least a B- in CRIM 2304 or CRIM 3304 (Canadian Criminal Justice System) and CRIM 2110 (Exploring Criminology). Completing a minor in criminology will also require that you complete an additional 15 credit hours in criminology at the 3000-level or above.

 

Q:  I haven’t completed CRIM 3010 (Classical Theory) but I need it to graduate. Since it won’t be offered next academic year, what do I do?         

A:  Instead of taking CRIM 3010 (Classical Theory) you will be required to take an additional 3000-level or 4000-level CRIM elective.

 

Q:  I completed CRIM 3010 (Classical Theory), but I won’t declare my major in criminology until 2019-20. What happens to this course?

A:  In this situation, CRIM 3010 will count as one of your 3000-level CRIM electives.

 

Q:  I’ve already taken CRIM 2303 (Introduction to Criminology). Do I now need to take CRIM 1303 (Introduction to Criminology)?

A:  No, in this situation, you won’t need to complete CRIM 1303. If you declared your major before 2019-20, CRIM 2303 will count towards your major requirements. If you didn’t declare your major before 2019-20, CRIM 2303 will count as CRIM 1303.

 

Q:  I’ve already taken CRIM 3304 (Canadian Criminal Justice System). Do I now need to take CRIM 2304 (Canadian Criminal Justice System)?

A:  No, in this situation, you won’t need to complete CRIM 2304. If you declared your major before 2019-20, CRIM 3304 will count towards your major requirements. If you didn’t declare your major before 2019-20, CRIM 3304 will count as CRIM 2304.

 

Q:  I’ve already declared my major, but I didn’t complete CRIM 2303 (Introduction to Criminology) and/or CRIM 3304 (Canadian Criminal Justice System). Since these courses have changed, what do I do?

A:  If you haven’t completed CRIM 2303, complete CRIM 1303 (Introduction to Criminology) and it will count as CRIM 2303. If you haven’t completed CRIM 3304, complete CRIM 2304 (Canadian Criminal Justice System) and it will count as CRIM 3304.

 

Q:  I’ve already taken CRIM 3011 when it was called Contemporary Criminological Theory. Do I need to take it again, since its name has been changed to Criminological Theory?

A:  If you completed CRIM 3011, you don’t need to complete it again.

 

Q:  I took SOCI 1210 (Introduction to Sociology). Will it count toward my CRIM major?

A:  If you didn’t declare your major before 2019-20, then SOCI 1210 will not count toward your CRIM major. However, it will count toward your social sciences requirements for your Arts degree.

 

Q:  I’m a double major and am taking research methods courses from another department (e.g., sociology or psychology). Do I need to take research methods courses in criminology?

A:  If you declared your major in 2018-19 or before, then you will be required to complete CRIM 3102 (Quantitative Methods) and CRIM 3100 (Qualitative Methods). If you declared your major in 2019-20, then you may count quantitative methods taken in sociology (SOCI 3102) or psychology (PSYC 2350) as CRIM 3102. Similarly, you may count qualitative methods taken in sociology (SOCI 3100) as CRIM 3100.

 

Q:  Are criminology courses still cross-listed with sociology or other departments?

A:  No. Cross-listed courses are no longer being offered. Instead, you have the option of counting one 3000-level course and one 4000-level course taken outside of the Department of Criminology toward your criminology major. Refer to the 2019-20 academic calendar for a list of eligible criminology-related courses.

 

Q:  I’m taking a course in another Department that seems to overlap with criminology. Can it be counted towards my criminology major if it’s not on the list in the 2019-20 academic calendar?

A:  Possibly. Ask the Chair of the Department of Criminology.

 

Q:  I’ve completed almost all of the major requirements, but I didn’t declare a criminology major before 2019-20. What do I do?   

A:  Meet with the Chair of the Department of Criminology. They will explore options with you.

 

Q:  I’ve already declared my criminology major, but I think the new major requirements will benefit me. Can the new requirements be applied to me?

A:  Yes. Redeclaring your major will mean that the 2019-20 major requirements will apply to you. Complete a major declaration form (available online) and have it signed by an advisor in the Criminology Department. Note, however, that you will also need to meet the new admission criteria.

 

Q:  Why do I keep getting a prerequisite error when I try to register for 3000-level criminology courses?

A:  Before you can enroll in 3000-level criminology courses, you will first need to declare a major or minor in criminology.

 

Q:  Why do I keep getting a prerequisite error when I try to register for 4000-level criminology courses?

A:  In addition to declaring a major or minor in criminology, most 4000-level criminology courses require that you complete the core 3000-level theory and methods courses.

 

Q:  A criminology class that I want to take is full. Is there a way for me to get into it?

A:  Overrides will not be granted into criminology courses that are full. The only way to enroll in the course is to monitor Banner to see if a space becomes available. In exceptional circumstances in which a student’s graduation will be delayed, the Chair of the Department of Criminology will consider override requests.

 

Q:  Why don’t I see any labs for CRIM 3102 (Quantitative Methods) or CRIM 3100 (Qualitative Methods) on Banner?               

A:  Beginning in the 2019-20 academic year, students will no longer be required to complete labs for these courses.