Department of History

Current Courses

2018-19

NB:

  1. Cross-listed courses:  certain courses offered by the Departments of Modern Languages and Classics, Anthropology, and Religious Studies may, in special circumstances, be cross-listed and counted towards a major, minor, or concentration in History. In such cases, the student must obtain the Department's permission.  Those courses automatically acceptable in History are listed in the Academic Calendar and appear below.

  2. The following denotes full-year courses: "1XX/2YY," "AXX/AYY," "BXX/BYY." Students must enroll for both semesters when registering.  (The A and B designations denote different sections of the same course.)

  3. "WW" denotes web courses.

  4. Students are reminded that not every course listed in the Academic Calendar can be offered every year.  Some classes are only offered every couple years.  Students are encouraged to consult with the Department regarding course offerings in planning their schedules.

  5. Students are reminded that courses in History can be applicable for credit towards majors and minors in other disciplines and interdisciplinary programs and that not all courses automatically appear as such in the Academic Calendar.  Students are encouraged to consult with Departmental Chairs and Program Coordinators about specific courses in History that may be eligible for credit in programs outside History.

Class locations:

AG Art Gallery of Nova Scotia
AT Atrium
B Burke Building
DA Akerley Blvd., Dartmouth
DL Dartmouth Library
DT Spring Garden Road Library
HC Homburg Centre
LA Loyola Academic
ME McNally East
MM McNally Main
MN McNally North
MS McNally South
P21 Pier 21
SB Sobey Building
WT World Trade Convention Center

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1000 1A/2A - Making History (Fall/Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: B207
Course Description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1000 1B/2B - Making History (Fall/Winter)
R. Barbosa
MW11:30 - 12:45 am
Class location: MM227/LA282
Course description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1201 1XX/2YY – Civilization in the West (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
L. Warner
TR 1 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA175
Course description: Modern Western cultures, from Canada and the United States to Britain and Australia, have complex multi-ethnic histories and origins, but they all bear the influence of a common European heritage.  This course aims to provide a broad introduction to the history of western civilization from around 500 B.C. until 1918 A.D., surveying major events, cultural developments and personalities during a period when so many of the familiar ideas, institutions, practices and ways of thinking of the modern Western world took shape.
 
HIST 1203 1XX/2YY - The Twentieth Century (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
TBA
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: An historical approach to the major problems of our time.  Emphasis will be placed upon the backgrounds to World Wars I and II, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the Communist Revolution and its impact, and the problems of industrial society.
 
HIST 1215 1 - Ireland: An Introduction (Fall)
M. Vance
TR 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: The course is a general introduction to Ireland through a survey of the island’s history. Although it is situated on the fringes of Europe, Ireland was influenced by developments on the continent from the earliest times. In addition, the later experience of overseas migration connected Ireland to developments across the Atlantic and beyond. This course will pay particular attention to how Ireland’s history reflects these broader European and transatlantic connections.
 
HIST 1222 1 - Introduction to East Asian History (Fall)
X. Sun
MW 11:30 - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA181
Course description: This introductory course explores historical change and social transformation in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from antiquity to the present.  Emphasizing especially the Chinese and Japanese experiences, the class will examine some of the more salient social, intellectual, political, and economic features apparent in the heritage of these societies as well as some of the ways each society has influenced the others.
Note:  No previous study of Asia is required but students who have taken HIST 1209.0 cannot receive another credit for this course.
 
HIST 1252 1 – Canada to Confederation (Fall)
N. Neatby
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: B205
Course description: This course will examine early Canadian history from the time of the first native-European contact up to Confederation.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of New France/Lower Canada, Upper Canada, and the West.  Political, social, and economic themes will be considered.
 
HIST 1253 1 – Canada Since Confederation (Fall)
TBA
MW 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA187
Course description: This course will examine the shape of political culture in modern Canada; the debate between the advocates of the nation state and of federalism; and the impact of industrialization, regionalism, war, and depression on that debate.
 
HIST 1253 2A / 2B / 2C - Canada: Confederation to Present (Winter)
TBA
MW 4 - 5:15 pm / 11:30 am - 12:45 pm / TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: SB265 / LA188 / SB160
Course description: See above
 
HIST 1255 1 - The United States: 1865 to Present (Fall)
TBA
TR 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA297
Course Description: This course will explore the history of the modern United States since its Civil War, examining the social, economic, political, and transnational developments of the last century and a half. Through lectures and reading, we will cover such themes as political economy, international relations, urbanization, social movements, migration, and the development of the state.
 
HIST 1301 1A/1B - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Fall)
TBA
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm / TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA188 / ME105
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 2/2B - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Winter)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am / 1 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA296 / LA188 
Course description: Please see above.

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2000 Level Courses

 

HIST 2201 2 - Environmental History of Europe: 1300-1900 (Winter)
L. Warner
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA273
Course description: From farming practices in the medieval period to the smog and blackened landscapes of the industrial nineteenth century, Europeans have had an impact on their environment. Students explore the changes and how European encounters with the new world brought disease, and an exchange of foods, animals and plants between 204 History the continents. This course provides a long-term perspective on changes in climate, water and land use, breeding as well as species extinction, and the foods available in Europe and its North American colonies from 1300-1900.
 
HIST 2203 1 History of Childhood (Fall)
L. Warner
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: MM223
Course description: Students consider the child in Europe from infancy to adolescence through swaddling, disease, play and toys, the life of girls and boys, child labour, schooling, foundlings and orphans to the development of children’s rights. Students analyze evidence such as letters, diaries, novels, paintings, court records, furniture and clothing.
 
HIST 2250 1 Soccer: A History of Brazil (Fall)
R. Barbosa
T 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: LA271
Course description: Students will trace the historical forces behind the evolution of soccer in Brazil – from an elite sport to a national passion with unifying powers. Topics include: the transition to a slave free society, immigration, the development of a national identity, urbanization, the military dictatorship, as well as gender divisions and the role of the media and economics behind the popularity of the sport.
 
HIST 2251 2 - Pop Culture in Latin America (Winter)
R. Barbosa
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA273
Course description: Students explore the development of popular culture in Latin America to discover how diversity, social and political struggles influenced the diverse cultural aspects of the region. Music will be a major focus (samba, salsa, tango among others), but emphasis will be also given to visual arts, film and TV.
 
HIST 2303 1XX/2YY - Tudor & Stuart Britain (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
T. Stretton
MW1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: MM223 / ME104
Course description: This lecture and seminar course provides a broad survey of the social, economic, cultural and political histories of Britain between 1485 and 1714, with a focus on original sources and images and how historians interpret them. It will examine how this small island nation on the fringes of Europe began its transformation into a dominant world power, while experiencing religious reformation, invasion threats, civil war, republican experiment, and the execution of one king and the forced exile of another. It will also examine some of the remarkable personalities of the age, from Mary Tudor and Queen Elizabeth to Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, and Isaac Newton.
 
HIST 2311 2 - Inheriting Atlantic Canada (Winter)
TBA
MW 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA178
Course description: Ideas, attitudes, and assumptions about Atlantic Canada have been influenced by social, cultural, political, religious, and ethnic traditions inherited from the past. The curriculum of this course covers a wide range of topics from gender, refinement, material culture, dress, food, and conspicuous consumption, to political choices and ethnic biases. Lectures, readings, class discussions, and mixed media demonstrate how historical events and previous ways of behaving and thinking continue to influence social and cultural customs and decision-making. 
 
HIST 2341 1 - Alantic Provinces History to 1867 (Fall)
B. Brown
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Course location: MM335
Course descriptionCommencing with the earliest Native-European contact in the Atlantic Provinces, students in this course will examine the interactions among the peoples who inhabited the region up until the mid-nineteenth century.  Major events, such as wars, treaties, and Confederation, will also be considered.
 
HIST 2342 2 - Alantic Provinces History From 1867 (Winter)
B. Brown
MW  2:30 - 3:45 pm
Course location: AT216
Course descriptionBeginning with the post-Confederation era, and then moving into the phases of industrialization and deindustrialization, students in this course will study social, economic, and political developments in the region up to the end of the twentieth century and beyond.  Major events such as the two World Wars will also be considered.
 
HIST 2346 1 - Black Heritage in Maritime Canada (Fall)
TBA
MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: This course will provide an historical survey of the Black population in Maritime Canada, its origins, socio-economic conditions, and evolution to the present.
 
HIST 2356 1 - Japan Since 1945 (Fall)
B. Sewell
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA277
Course description: Students examine the history of Japanese society after the Pacific War, with occasional reference to earlier eras. Through a thematic approach, exploring political, economic, intellectual, and social issues students may gain a more analytical understanding of contemporary Japanese society. 
 
HIST 2382 1 -  China in Revolution (Fall)
X. Sun
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA177
Course description: This course explores the collapse of imperial China and the ensuing efforts to renew Chinese society. While chronological, the course follows a thematic approach, considering the dynamics of political, economic, intellectual, and social change within the Late Imperial and Republican eras. 
 
HIST 2383 2 - China since 1949 (Winter)
X. Sun
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA271
Course description: This course explores Chinese since the founding of the People’s Republic. The course follows a thematic approach examining the dynamics of political, economic, intellectual, and social change so as to provide students with amore analytical understanding of contemporary China.
 
HIST 2393 1 - History of Vietnam (Fall)
B. Sewell
TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA176
Course description: After surveying the emergence of Vietnamese civilization from antiquity, students will explore Vietnam’s history since the founding of the Nguyen Dynasty. These roughly two centuries fall into four eras—dynastic, colonial, Cold War, and independent socialist republic—in which political, economic, intellectual, and social issues are addressed.
 
HIST 2394 2 - History of Korea (Winter)
B. Sewell 
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA282
Course description: After a brief survey of the rise of Korean civilization since antiquity, this course examines three turbulent eras in Korean history: (1) the long era of gradual change during the Yi dynasty that culminated in confrontation with imperialist powers, (2) the half-century of Japanese domination, and (3) the era of civil war and continuing division. Although the course proceeds chronologically, in order to provide students with a more analytical understanding the course employs a thematic approach, considering political, economic, intellectual, and social issues in each era. 
 
HIST 2402 2 - History of Cuba (Winter)
TBA
MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: Students will gain a multifaceted and nuanced view of Cuba's complex past, examining how this history has shaped and continues to shape the present. Themes include gender and race relations, social policies and programs, governance and politics, state-building and economic development.
 
HIST 2421 1 - The World at War 1939-1945 (Fall)
TBA
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: Students are introduced to the Second World War and its importance in global history. Themes include: the war’s roots in the 1920s and 1930s, the goals of Axis and Allied powers, and military operations on land, at sea, and in the History 209 air. Special attention will be paid to the war’s impact on civilians.
 
HIST 2440 1 - Revolutions in Latin America (Fall)
R. Barbosa
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM209
Course description: Students examine some of the major revolutions that have taken place in 20th-Century Latin America. Students explore the background, participants, reasons and consequences of these revolutions.
 
HIST 2452 1 - Greek History: The Golden Age of Greece (Fall)
Alison Barclay
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: An introduction to the history of the Greeks from the Persian Wars through the death of Alexander the Great. Students will study the historical, political and cultural developments of the Greeks in the 5th and 4th centuries BC, including the rise and fall of Athens, democracy in action and the cultural achievements of Athens in her “Golden Age” (e.g. religion, theatre, philosophy, art and architecture). Students will also explore the activities of other Greek states (e.g. Sparta, Boeotia, Syracuse), the roles of men and women in Greek society, the causes and aftermath of the Peloponnesian wars, the conquest of Greece by Phillip II of Macedon and of the Persian Empire by his son, Alexander. Students will be asked to read various works of ancient authors and to consider archaeological and epigraphical evidence relevant to this period of Greek history.
 
HIST 2454 1 - Bloody Caesars: Roman History II (Fall)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA174
Course description: An introduction to the history of the Roman world from the establishment of the Principate under Octavian/Augustus to the decline of the Roman empire in the western Mediterranean and Europe. This course will explore the evolution of the Principate and its eventual replacement by the Dominate, the nature of Roman imperialism, the role of the emperor as a political and religious figure, the interaction among the Romans and their neighbours in central Europe and the Near East, and the eventual political and economic disintegration of the imperial system. Students will be asked to consider such topics as different models of Roman economic, social, and political organization, the role and status of women in the Roman world, the codification of the Roman legal system, and the intellectual and religious developments that laid the foundations for subsequent historical periods in Western Europe and the Mediterranean. Students will be asked to read the works of various ancient authors and to consider archaeological and epigraphic evidence relevant to the history of the Roman imperial period. 
 
HIST 2471 1 - History of Football (Fall)
J. Reid
TR 10:00 - 11;15 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: Students analytically examine the evolution of sports such as soccer, rugby, Australian and North American football from the nineteenth century onwards, commencing with the earliest forms of vernacular football. Australian and North American football from the nineteenth century onwards. Although the scope will be international, special attention will be paid to Atlantic Canada.
 
HIST 2472 2 - History of Hockey (Winter)
J. Reid
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: Students analytically examine the evolution of sports such as shinty, hurling, field hockey, ice hockey, and sledge hockey from the nineteenth century onwards, commencing with the earliest forms of vernacular stick sports. Although the scope will be international, special attention will be paid to Atlantic Canada.
 
HIST 2500 1 - War and Society in the Ancient Meditarranean (Fall)
TBA
TR 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA173
Course description: This course is an introduction to warfare as it was practiced by the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean and the degree to which military organization and the act of waging war affected other aspects of these societies, including political ideology, religious beliefs, and economic exchange systems.
 
HIST 2826 1XW/2YW - War and Society (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
WEB
WEB
Course description: This course is an introduction to warfare as it was practiced by the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean and the degree to which military organization and the act of waging war affected other aspects of these societies, including political ideology, religious beliefs, and economic exchange systems
 
HIST 2848 2 - Asia-Pacific War 1937-1945 (Winter)
B. Sewell
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: TBA

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3000 Level Courses

 

HIST 3000 1 / 2- The Discipline of History (Fall / Winter)
B. Brown / M. Vance
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm / TR 8:30 - 9:45 pm
Class location: MM223 / LA274
Course description: This course addresses the theories, methods, principles and problems associated with the discipline of history. It examines the following basic areas of historical inquiry: the purposes of historical study; the relevance of the past; the relationship between the past and present; the nature and validity of historical knowledge; the relationship of history to other disciplines; and the development of historical interpretation. 
 
HIST 3100 2 - Gender & Sexuality in Canada (Winter)
N. Neatby
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM209
Course description: This course offers a survey of the historical experiences, status and activities of Canadian women in all their diversity from 1900 to the present. Topics will include women’s economically valuable work in the household and the paid labour force, and family life and sexuality. Special emphasis will be placed on women’s struggles for economic equality and full political and social participation in Canadian society
 
HIST 3110 1 - Women in the Two World Wars (Fall)
TBA

TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM209 

Course description: Students examine women’s experiences during the First and Second World Wars. During both conflicts, women fought as soldiers and spies, worked in industry and support services, tended to the wounded and served as symbols of home and family. Women were also targets of unprecedented violence. 
 
HIST 3202 2 - History of Medicine (Winter)
P. Twohig
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: AT216
Course description: Students examine the history of medicine, with an emphasis on Europe and North America, and how medicine in those areas interacted with other medical systems, including Arabic and Chinese medicine. Topics to be considered will include the impact of epidemic disease, ideas of disease causation and treatment, the rise of the hospital, medicine and war, and the creation of an idea of international and global health.
 
HIST 3203 1WW - History of the Body, Health & Sex (Fall)
L. Warner
WEB
Students surveys the changing knowledge of human anatomy, attitudes to health care, hygiene, and clothing, understandings of conception, pregnancy and childbirth as well as the histories of sexuality and same-sex relationships in the centuries from the Renaissance to the early industrial era.
 
HIST 3465 2 - Scotland's Histories (Winter) 
K. Kehoe 
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm 
Class location: LA274
Course description: This course examines Scottish historiography in order to illustrate the development of Scotland’s competing identities from the early modern period to the present. Tensions along regional, ethnic, gender and class lines will be highlighted. Contemporary associations such as: Golf, whisky, Mary Queen of Scots, sober Presbyterians, the Highland Clearances, Glasgow’s football rivalry, and Trade Union radicals will be discussed.
 
HIST 3475 2 - Indigenous & Settler Histories (Winter) 
M. Vance
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM227
Course description: Relations between indigenous peoples and settler societies have been problematic wherever European colonization has taken place. Students will study how these relationships have evolved over time with a view to developing a historical understanding of contemporary issues.
 
HIST 3500 1 - Field Course in History (Fall)
M. McCallum
W 1:00 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM030
Course description: Students are introduced to the application of archaeological method and theory to the study of history through a series of case studies. These case studies will focus on various periods in the history of Nova Scotia, paying particular attention to marginal and marginalized groups with respect to the historical record. Students travel to and study sites within the province of Nova Scotia, and make use of relevant archives. The case studies vary from year to year.

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4000 Level Courses

HIST 4401 2 - Crime in Canada (Winter)
B. Brown
M 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this examination of Canadian criminal justice history, subjects include: the changing definition of crime as understood by local communities and the state, law enforcement, the trial process, punishment, moral regulation and the role of gender, race, and ethnicity in shaping the development and operation of the justice system.
 
HIST 4500 1XX/2YY - The Honours Seminar (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
N. Neatby
T 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Honours History students have the opportunity to engage in independent research and write an honours thesis with the help and direction of a supervisor.  The Honours Seminar provides a framework to assist each student in the preparation of the thesis.  The seminar places an emphasis on research skills, historical methods and approaches, theories of history and the use of sources and evidence in order to help students develop and write the honours thesis.  Students will be evaluated on their course work and presentations as well as the honours thesis.
 
HIST 4572 1 - Memories of WWII in Asia (Fall)
X. Sun
M 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this seminar, students examine memories of the Asia-Pacific War in China, Korea and Japan. They will investigate how history and politics have been shaping and shaped by collective and individual memories of this conflict.
 
HIST 4574 2 - Interdisciplinary Study of Asia: Food (Winter)
X. Sun
M 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN519
Course description: In this seminar students examine memories of the Asia-Pacific War in China, Korea and Japan. They will investigate how history and politics have been shaping and shaped by collective and individual memories of this conflict.
 
HIST 4830 2 - Sp Top: Shakespeare's London (Winter)
T. Stretton
T 1:00 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: The histories of Shakespeare and London intersect in interesting ways. Students will explore topics such as theatres and theatregoers, education, law and litigation, the royal court, the topicality of particular plays, censorship, and the cosmopolitan mix of nationalities in the fastest growing city in Europe.
 
HIST 4846 2 - Seminar in Community Leadersip (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this course students use historical perspectives to understand current affairs in meaningful and evidence-based ways. Students are challenged to think about the broad application of research, communication, and critical-thinking skills to real-world situations through guest lectures, innovative learning materials and project creation. 
 
HIST 4885 1 - Reappraisals of Alt Canada Past (Fall)
J. Reid 
W 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This course will focus on key areas in Atlantic Canada's past that have been re-evaluated by the scholarship of the Acadiensis era, from 1971 to the present. Examples of topics to be explored are: the significance of aboriginal imperial treaties; the expulsion of the Acadians; women and political history; industrialization and deindustrialization; borderlands; environmental change.
 

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6000 Level Courses

HIST 6650 1XX/2YY - Seminar in Advanced Historiography (Fall/Winter)  - Required
6 credits (Full-year course)
N Neatby
T 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course Description: This seminar will examine selected contemporary historiographical issues and guide Masters students in the preparation of their thesis proposals.
 
HIST 6661 1- Reappraisals of Alt Canada Past (Fall)
J. Reid
W 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: See 4885 1
 
HIST 6672 1 - Memories of WWII in East Asia (Fall)
X. Sun
M 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: See HIST 4572 1
 
HIST 6674 2 - Grad Seminar: Community Leadership (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Course location: MN219
Course description: See HIST 4846 2
 
HIST 6675 2 - Sp Top: Crime in Canada (Winter)
Blake Brown
R 1:00 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: See HIST 4401 2 
 
HIST 6679 2 - Sp Top: Interdisciplinary Study of Asia: Food (Winter)
X. Sun
M 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN519
Course description: See HIST 4574 2
 
HIST 6680 2 - Sp Top: Shakespeare's London (Winter)
T. Stretton
T 1:00-3:45 
Class location: MN219
Course description: See HIST 4830 2
 
HIST 6690 1XX/2YY – Thesis Research (Fall/Winter) - Required
N. Neatby
TBA
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Students will engage in the research and writing of a thesis under the supervision of a thesis supervisor.  The student must satisfy the supervisor that thesis research and all other methodological and disciplinary preparation for the successful handling of the thesis topic have been completed.  Supervisors may require a demonstration of language competence or extra course work as preparation for the treatment of certain thesis topics.  Students will publicly defend their thesis, following which a final grade will be determined by the thesis committee.
 

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